Author Archive for Lynne

Color Impact & Emotions

Color Meanings:
Color psychology affects our lives in so many ways, yet we often don’t realize the impact of the color choices on our daily lives from stationery and packaging, on a website, in a retail store or office, in marketing and even clothing. Understanding color meanings is essential when you are choosing for a project, especially in business.

The Power of Color:
Every color and every shade creates associations and has a personality. Color has always had a huge impact on how people react to a product. Color has a powerful subconscious effect on every part of our lives, without even saying a word; an understanding of color meanings gives us an invaluable tool to get the best response to our efforts and ultimately to create a winning result.

Color info-graphic

Color Impact and Emotions

In applying the information about color meanings to enhance your project, don’t use any color entirely on its own; it is best to use a complementary color with your main choice as over-use of any one color can negate its effect and in fact have the opposite effect.

Identify The Character of the project.
By identifying the characteristics of the project, you can find the color that expresses what you’re after. In Business, remember that all the designs for your brand will be affected by the logo color. It will dictate the backgrounds, elements and even business cards. Be aware of just how the importance of the logo color is as your customer’s first impression of your brand.

There is almost always more than one option of color combinations to assist your design, so you don’t have to choose any color that does not resonate. Or you may use a disliked color in a very small amount to get the right response. The Color Info- graphic is a free PDF for reference. One other items to take in to consideration when choosing color(s). from the screen to print to even your eyes, color is subjective and it will vary from screen to screen and from printer to printer.

Note-worthy extras:
• Black is the easiest to read.
• Blue is the most popular company logo color. 42% of people say that blue is their favorite color and most people like at least one shade of blue.
• Brown is a strong, reassuring color that is comforting and reliable. Emotions: rustic, depth, earthy, stability, warm, comfort, utility, poverty, rough, & simple.
• Gold is associated with value, luxury and prestige. It reflects wisdom, beauty and generosity.
• Grey is a very popular color for corporate logos, but it is also the least popular color and many people find it dull and somber.
• Indigo is a powerful and strong color which conveys integrity and sincerity. It is associated with structure and rituals.
• Magenta is a practical yet spiritual color. Compassionate and kind, it encourages a balanced outlook based on common sense.
• Pink is white plus red and inspires compassion and nurturing. It is a non-threatening color used most often in
feminine businesses, but isn’t necessarily the best way of connecting with a female audience. Most women say that blue is their favorite color, with purple a close second. Emotions: feminine, fun, delicate, gentle, & romantic.
• Silver is a modern sophisticated color, calming yet uplifting, with a degree of mystery about it.
• Turquoise balances and recharges the emotions and inspires good communication skills and self-expression.
• Yellow is a very strong color, but it isn’t easy to see against white.

Sources:
http://www.digitalinformationworld.com/2013/08/how-colors-influence-people-psychology.html
http://www.bitrebels.com/design/impact-of-logo-color-infographic/
http://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/color-meanings-in-business.html

Working with a Graphic Designer

Working With A Graphic Designer

Your small business is growing and you are starting to make decisions that free up your time to focus on the parts of your business that you love, you know, the things that made you start the business in the first place.

Whether for a single item, a number of projects or a long term contract, these tips can help you to get the most from working with a graphic designer and contribute to a successful outcome, plus make the whole process a lot smoother.

courtesy https://www.hubspot.com/

Collaborate
Graphic design is a collaboration between the client and the designer. The design process and the whole project will be completed faster and more efficiently with mutual understanding and good communication. When meeting a designer for the first time, be ready to:

Explain your Business
Be prepared to talk about your business – your whole business, from the company culture to long term goals and especially the audience or target market. A good graphic designer should ask lots of questions, to really understand where you are in planning, marketing and the goals for the company and the project. But, you should be able to explain your business without a prompt and that will significantly improve your results!

Details, Details, Details
Next, talk about all the details on the project itself. What are your ideas, suggestions and thoughts, plus all the information about the project, product or service. If there is a team working on the project it helps to get input from everyone involved right from the start.

Know What You Like
Lastly, find and share examples with the designer – some visuals you like as well as some you don’t… three to five samples of each and don’t limit the samples to your particular industry or business. The samples are visual clues that help the designer determine where to start. It also is very helpful if you can be specific in why you like something or not.

And this is just the first meeting. Every designer from graphics to interior to landscape has their own way to interact with a customer, but the more information available at the start of a project, the faster the final product can be ready to go. And that saves you time, frustration and money.

Communication is Key!
To effectively communicate with your graphic designer be sure you are ‘speaking the same language.’ Ask questions, establish a reasonable time-line and be willing to learn a little about the elements of design (link), If you do not understand something that the designer says, be sure to get clarification. Be specific when talking about the details of the project. Vocabulary varies from industry to industry as do acronyms, so be sure to learn the lingo to understand your designer.

In “8 Best Tips for Working With Graphic Designers, by Ian Mills [ (6 10 2014) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ian-mills/8-best-tips-for-worki_b_5473608.html] Mr Mills says “Design is a subjective process and there is no set-in-stone “right-way” to go about it. But it is a collaborative process and understanding that process, having realistic expectations, patience and excellent communication will go a long way towards a successful outcome.”

Speak up! Share your thoughts – let’s open the dialog.
Designers, what would you add?
Business owners what kind of information would be helpful?